What does Psalm 19:4 mean?
ESV: Their voice goes out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them he has set a tent for the sun,
NIV: Yet their voice goes out into all the earth, their words to the ends of the world. In the heavens God has pitched a tent for the sun.
NASB: Their line has gone out into all the earth, And their words to the end of the world. In them He has placed a tent for the sun,
CSB: Their message has gone out to the whole earth, and their words to the ends of the world. In the heavens he has pitched a tent for the sun.
NLT: Yet their message has gone throughout the earth, and their words to all the world. God has made a home in the heavens for the sun.
KJV: Their line is gone out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them hath he set a tabernacle for the sun,
NKJV: Their line has gone out through all the earth, And their words to the end of the world. In them He has set a tabernacle for the sun,
Verse Commentary:
The heavens and the sky carry their message about God's glory throughout the earth. The apostle Paul quoted this statement in Romans 10:18. By doing so he noted that the message about God delivered by nature preceded the message of the gospel, and made the Gentiles and Jews inexcusable (Romans 1:18–20).

In his preaching, Paul often referred to nature as God's creation before presenting the gospel of Christ. By doing this, he pointed out things which even non-believers can see as evidence of the truth. For instance, he told the pagans at Lystra they should turn from vain idols to the living God, "who made the heaven and the earth and the sea and all that is in them" (Acts 14:15). Also, at Athens he referred to God as the maker of the world and everything in it (Acts 17:24) before summoning the Athenians to repent (Acts 17:30–31).

Here, David refers to the sky as the domain God has given to the sun. He established its place and the way we observe its track through the sky.
Verse Context:
Psalm 19:1–6 focuses on creation as a means by which God reveals Himself to mankind. The heavens and the sky offer testimony about God both night and day. This revelation reaches everyone, just as the sun in its strength appears daily and reaches everywhere. This establishes, in part, the idea that all people have ample evidence telling them that God exists.
Chapter Summary:
David refers to the details of creation as evidence for God's power and design. The appearance and function of nature are evidence of God's majesty. The second half of this psalm also celebrates God's revelation, but in the form of His Word. The law, precepts, and commandments of God are hailed for their perfection and benefit.
Chapter Context:
This psalm of David celebrates two separate revelations which God has given human beings. He has revealed Himself in nature and in Scripture. Psalm 8 is a companion psalm because it, too, refers to nature as revealing God's majesty. Romans 1:18–25 also points out that God revealed himself through nature, but the passage indicates that disobedient people rejected this revelation.
Book Summary:
The book of Psalms is composed of individual songs, hymns, or poems, each of which is a ''Psalm'' in and of itself. These works contain a wide variety of themes. Some Psalms focus on praising and worshipping God. Others cry out in anguish over the pain of life. Still other Psalms look forward to the coming of the Messiah. While some Psalms are related, each has its own historical and biblical context.
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