What does Philippians 2:11 mean?
ESV: and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
NIV: and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
NASB: and that every tongue will confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
CSB: and every tongue will confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
NLT: and every tongue declare that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
KJV: And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
Verse Commentary:
This concludes the hymn of verses 6–11. Paul touches on one final aspect of the exaltation of Jesus, with a focus on the glory of God. In addition to every knee bowing before Jesus (Philippians 2:10), all people will, one day, admit that He is God and Messiah. God's preference is that this happens in life, while there is a chance for salvation (2 Peter 3:9), rather than after death, when it is too late (Revelation 20:15).

This inevitable victory will bring glory to God the Father. The glory of God is a common scriptural theme, seen both in the Old Testament (Psalm 19:1; 106:20; Proverbs 25:2) as well as several times in the New Testament. Jesus spoke of God's glory (John 11:4, 40). Stephen saw the glory of God before his death (Acts 7:55). All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23). Believers rejoice in the hope of the "glory of God" (Romans 5:2). In fact, believers are to do all things for the glory of God (1 Corinthians 10:31). Revelation notes the glory of God on three occasions (15:8; 21:11, 23), with the glory of God ultimately giving light to the new heavens and earth.
Verse Context:
Philippians 2:6–11 is a poetic description of Jesus' willingness to humble Himself for our sake. Rather than coming first as God and King, Jesus freely took on the form of a human being. He was humiliated and oppressed, following the will of the Father, in order to be the sacrifice for our sins. As a result, ''Jesus'' will be given the ultimate glory and honor. Eventually, all people, whether they want to or not, will admit that Jesus Christ is, in fact, Lord. For some, this will happen too late.
Chapter Summary:
Paul describes Jesus Christ as one willing to be humble, in obedience to God the Father. For this, God will exalt Jesus' name above all others. Someday, one way or another, all people will admit that Jesus Christ is Lord, and submit to Him. Paul wants the Philippian believers to live with contentment and unity, without complaining. Instructions are given regarding two visitors. The first is actually the one delivering this letter, Epaphroditus. The other is Timothy, Paul's trusted friend, who hopefully will be visiting soon.
Chapter Context:
Philippians 1 focused on the importance of perspective. A Christian's life, lived for Christ, may be hard or easy, but all things can give God glory. Chapter 2 frames this concept through the humility shown by Jesus Christ. His willingness to obey God the Father, even being crucified, is the ultimate example of humble service. In return, His name will be honored more than any other. Paul's instructions regarding Timothy and Epaphroditus also form a bridge to chapter 3, where Paul will contrast these good men with the dangers of false teachers.
Book Summary:
Philippians is Paul's discussion of living the Christian life. In this letter to the church of Philippi, Paul highlights themes such as joy and glory. He also puts great emphasis on how a Christian's thinking—their attitude—affects the way they live out their faith. Paul is very thankful for the support of the Philippian church, but is also concerned about the influence of various false teachers. This letter is less theological than most of his other writings, and more practical.
Accessed 11/30/2023 6:07:49 AM
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