What does Mark 8:38 mean?
ESV: For whoever is ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of him will the Son of Man also be ashamed when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”
NIV: If anyone is ashamed of me and my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will be ashamed of them when he comes in his Father's glory with the holy angels.'
NASB: For whoever is ashamed of Me and My words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will also be ashamed of him when He comes in the glory of His Father with the holy angels.'
CSB: For whoever is ashamed of me and my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will also be ashamed of him when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels."
NLT: If anyone is ashamed of me and my message in these adulterous and sinful days, the Son of Man will be ashamed of that person when he returns in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.'
KJV: Whosoever therefore shall be ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation; of him also shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he cometh in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.
NKJV: For whoever is ashamed of Me and My words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of him the Son of Man also will be ashamed when He comes in the glory of His Father with the holy angels.”
Verse Commentary:
"Adulterous" is from the Greek root word moichalis. Metaphorically, it means to reject God and chase after what the world offers. The term was used extensively of the Jews in the Old Testament when they worshiped foreign idols.

"Glory" is from the Greek root word doxa and means splendor, brightness, and exaltation. Scholars disagree on the time of Jesus' glory; some say it will be at the rapture (1 Thessalonians 4:13–18) while others say it refers to Jesus' second coming at end of the tribulation (Revelation 19:11–21). Since it is at the second coming that Jesus officially returns to earth in glory, the verse most likely refers to the latter event.

In the course of three chapters, it is affirmed that Jesus is the Christ twice (Mark 8:29; 9:2–8); Jesus reveals His coming suffering, death, and resurrection three times (Mark 8:31; 9:31; 10:33–34), and tells the disciples they must be humble many times (Mark 9:35, 40–41; 10:15, 24–25, 42–45). The two times Jesus show the disciples a hint of His glory, He tells them to tell no one (Mark 8:30; 9:9), but He never gives a similar order about His coming disgrace and death. In fact, He calls His followers—at least metaphorically but often literally—to join Him on the cross (Mark 8:34).

Jesus warns the disciples that their idea of what is shameful and what is honorable is completely warped. They cannot share the glory of the Son of Man from Daniel 7 if they reject the Suffering Servant of Isaiah 52:13—53:12. They will understand eventually. Although after the crucifixion they will hide in fear (John 20:19), soon they will greet prison and beatings with joy, as a sign they are worthy to suffer for their Savior (Acts 5:40–41).
Verse Context:
Mark 8:34—9:1 deals with sacrifice and rewards. To follow Jesus the disciples have sacrificed their livelihoods (Mark 1:16–20; 2:14), reputations (Mark 2:18, 23–24; 7:5), regular meals (Mark 6:30–31), and sleep (Mark 1:32–37; 6:45–48). In return, they expect glory (Mark 9:33–37) and power (Mark 10:35–45). Jesus explains that God's timing is more strategic and their roles are more important and difficult than they could imagine. To follow Christ, we must follow Him: His teaching (Mark 8:38), His life (Mark 10:42–45), and His sacrifice (John 15:20). In return, we should not expect earthly rewards, but we will get eternal life. Matthew 16:24–28 and Luke 9:23–27 also record these events.
Chapter Summary:
This chapter describes another miraculous feeding of thousands by Jesus. He also counters the hard-hearted and selfish hypocrisy of the Pharisees in seeking even more miraculous signs. Speaking to the disciples, Jesus rebukes their short memories and reminds them about God's intent to provide for His followers. After healing a blind man, Jesus accepts Peter's proclamation that Jesus is the Messiah. Almost immediately, though, Jesus rebukes Peter for resisting the idea that the Messiah must suffer and die.
Chapter Context:
Mark 8 continues Jesus' attempts to teach the disciples God's plan for the Messiah. Jesus has not come for the religious Pharisees but for the meek who willingly respond to Him. He has not yet come as the glorious and victorious champion of Israel, but to die for the whole world. And His followers must also be willing to sacrifice their lives. The chapter marks a turning point in Jesus' ministry as His miracles grow fewer and His teaching increases. Interestingly, Jesus also faces a repeat of the temptations He experienced in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1–11).
Book Summary:
The Gospel of Mark emphasizes both Jesus' servanthood and His role as the promised Messiah: the Son of God. This is done through a concise, action-packed style. Mark provides relatively few details, instead focusing on actions and simple statements. This relates to the Gospel's authorship, which is believed to be based on the memories of the apostle Peter. These include many of Jesus' miracles, in contrast to other Gospels which include many more of Jesus' teachings and parables. Mark also makes frequent mention of Jesus' ministry being misunderstood by others.
Accessed 5/30/2024 5:15:52 AM
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