What does Mark 14:58 mean?
ESV: “We heard him say, ‘I will destroy this temple that is made with hands, and in three days I will build another, not made with hands.’”
NIV: We heard him say, 'I will destroy this temple made with human hands and in three days will build another, not made with hands.''
NASB: We heard Him say, ‘I will destroy this temple that was made by hands, and in three days I will build another, made without hands.’?'
CSB: "We heard him say, 'I will destroy this temple made with human hands, and in three days I will build another not made by hands.' "
NLT: We heard him say, ‘I will destroy this Temple made with human hands, and in three days I will build another, made without human hands.’'
KJV: We heard him say, I will destroy this temple that is made with hands, and within three days I will build another made without hands.
NKJV: “We heard Him say, ‘I will destroy this temple made with hands, and within three days I will build another made without hands.’ ”
Verse Commentary:
Jesus' claim is recorded in John 2:19, shortly after He cleanses the temple courtyard of merchants the first time. The Jewish leadership confronts Him, asking for proof that He is authorized to drive out the money-changers and animal tradesmen. Jesus responds, "Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up." It's unclear if the Jewish leaders think He means His body or the actual temple. Jeremiah the prophet was nearly executed for merely prophesying that the temple will be destroyed, until the officials remembered Micah had said the same thing (Jeremiah 26:1–19). If the Jewish leaders interpret Jesus' words to mean the temple, it works in their favor; it is a capital offense under Roman law to destroy a place of worship.

Even so, the accusation, that Jesus threatened to destroy the temple, is false; Jesus never stated that He would destroy the temple, but if someone else destroyed the temple, He would rebuild it. And, later, among His own disciples, He does prophesy that the temple will be destroyed, but not by His own hand (Mark 13:2).

John 2:21 clarifies that Jesus hadn't even been talking about the real temple; He was talking about His body. Later, in Matthew 12:38–42, Jesus was more specific in describing the sign of Jonah. Jesus had done many miraculous things, but still the scribes and Pharisees didn't believe that God sent Him. They demanded a sign. Jesus told them they will receive no sign except that, "just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth" (Matthew 12:40).

Whether the Jewish leaders think Jesus was talking about the real temple or His body in the John 2 event, some, at least, know the truth (John 12:42). After Jesus is buried by Joseph of Arimathea, the chief priests and Pharisees tell Pilate that Jesus' disciples plan to steal His body and claim that He has risen. Pilate allows them to secure the stone over the tomb and set a guard (Matthew 27:62–66). When Jesus rises again, the chief priests and elders resort to bribing the guards to say the disciples took His body while they were sleeping (Matthew 28:11–15).
Verse Context:
Mark 14:53–65 happens immediately after Jesus' arrest in the garden of Gethsemane. Jesus will face four separated trials, in multiple segments. The first is with the Sanhedrin, the council that judges if Jews have broken the Mosaic law. The second trial is with Pilate, the Roman governor (Mark 15:1–5). Pilate sends Jesus to Herod Antipas, who rules over Jesus' home district of Galilee and happens to be in town (Luke 23:6–16). Herod sends Jesus back to Pilate who, at the Sanhedrin's insistence, sentences Jesus to death (Mark 15:6–15). Jesus' interview with the Sanhedrin is also found in Matthew 26:57–68, Luke 22:63–71, and John 18:12–14, 19–24.
Chapter Summary:
Jesus is anointed in a symbolic anticipation of His death. Judas decides to secretly cooperate with local religious leaders to arrest Jesus in secret. During the Passover meal, Jesus predicts His betrayal by Judas, and Peter's denial. He also institutes the Lord's Supper, also known as communion. After praying on the Mount of Olives, Jesus is captured when Judas identifies Him to a hostile mob sent by Jewish authorities. He endures a corrupt, prejudiced trial, ending in a conviction for blasphemy. Peter, fearing for his life, lies about knowing Jesus, before remembering Jesus' prediction and breaking down in sobs.
Chapter Context:
Jesus has finished His public teaching ministry and now prepares for the crucifixion. His sacrificial loyalty will provide the means by which the disciples' abandonment will be forgiven. Next, the Romans, as representatives of Gentiles throughout history, will join the Jews and kill Jesus. Jesus will be buried, but He will rise again with the promise that His sacrifice will redeem the world. Matthew 26 and Luke 22 follow Mark 14 more closely while John 13:1—18:27 records more of Jesus' teaching in the upper room.
Book Summary:
The Gospel of Mark emphasizes both Jesus' servanthood and His role as the promised Messiah: the Son of God. This is done through a concise, action-packed style. Mark provides relatively few details, instead focusing on actions and simple statements. This relates to the Gospel's authorship, which is believed to be based on the memories of the apostle Peter. These include many of Jesus' miracles, in contrast to other Gospels which include many more of Jesus' teachings and parables. Mark also makes frequent mention of Jesus' ministry being misunderstood by others.
Accessed 5/21/2024 1:35:03 PM
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