What does John 8:2 mean?
ESV: Early in the morning he came again to the temple. All the people came to him, and he sat down and taught them.
NIV: At dawn he appeared again in the temple courts, where all the people gathered around him, and he sat down to teach them.
NASB: And early in the morning He came again into the temple area, and all the people were coming to Him; and He sat down and began teaching them.
CSB: At dawn he went to the temple again, and all the people were coming to him. He sat down and began to teach them.
NLT: but early the next morning he was back again at the Temple. A crowd soon gathered, and he sat down and taught them.
KJV: And early in the morning he came again into the temple, and all the people came unto him; and he sat down, and taught them.
NKJV: Now early in the morning He came again into the temple, and all the people came to Him; and He sat down and taught them.
Verse Commentary:
At the end of chapter 7, Jesus was preaching during the Feast of Booths, using the rituals being performed as analogies for His own role as Messiah (John 7:37–38). The story here represents a sudden change in tone and content, which most scholars believe is not original to the text. Rather, this story of the adulterous woman is believed to be an authentic, true account, but one initially recorded in some other location of Scripture. Jesus' reference to light in verse 12 makes much more sense in the context of the Feast of Booths, where great lamps were lit as part of the festival. This passage, then, is useful and important, but needs to be considered separately from the surrounding context.

Scripture often records Jesus speaking and teaching to crowds (Luke 4:20; Matthew 5:1). It is Jesus' growing attention from the people of Jerusalem which worries the local religious leaders. In this passage, they once again attempt to trick Jesus in order to ruin His reputation with the people. Unlike other attempts, however, this one involves both a moral dilemma and a powerful, real-life example. Jesus' response to this trap teaches us about the importance of restraint, as well as sound judgment.
Verse Context:
John 7:53—8:11 is one of the most famous stories of the New Testament. However, scholars do not believe it was originally found in this particular place in Scripture. The flow of the gospel of John seems interrupted by the story. Also, in ancient manuscripts, these verses are located in various places. This leads to the consensus that it is a true story, but not part of John's original narrative of the Festival of Booths in chapters 7 and 8. Jesus' response to a trap sprung by the Pharisees is masterful. Though He alone has the moral authority to execute the woman for her sin, Jesus instead chooses forgiveness. This highlights a major concept of Christian ethics: just because one has the power to do something does not mean it's the best option.
Chapter Summary:
John chapter 8 includes the story of the adulterous woman, a well-known but controversial passage. Most scholars believe this story is authentic, but not originally found in this exact spot in Scripture. This chapter continues Jesus' preaching during the Feast of Booths, where He once again comes into conflict with local religious leaders. Here, Christ will make His second ''I AM'' statement, using the analogy of light, which is a common theme in Hebrew theology. This conversation will become more and more heated. Eventually, Jesus' opponents are enraged enough to attempt killing Him right then and there.
Chapter Context:
Jesus is attending the Feast of Booths in Jerusalem, and has once again come into conflict with the local religious authorities. In the previous chapter, Jesus referred to Himself as a source of living water, playing off of the festivals' ritual pouring of water in the temple. In this chapter, Jesus will use the imagery of lights, also related to festival traditions. This chapter demonstrates Jesus' willingness to be direct, even aggressive, with His critics. The next few chapters will complete Jesus' public ministry, as He prepares for His impending death.
Book Summary:
The disciple John wrote the gospel of John decades after the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke were written. The author assumes that a reader is already familiar with the content of these other works. So, John presents a different perspective, with a greater emphasis on meaning. John uses seven miracles—which he calls "signs"— to prove that Jesus is, in fact, God incarnate. Some of the most well-known verses in the Bible are found here. None is more famous than the one-sentence summary of the gospel found in John 3:16.
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