What does Hebrews 13:21 mean?
ESV: equip you with everything good that you may do his will, working in us that which is pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen.
NIV: equip you with everything good for doing his will, and may he work in us what is pleasing to him, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.
NASB: equip you in every good thing to do His will, working in us that which is pleasing in His sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be the glory forever and ever. Amen.
CSB: equip you with everything good to do his will, working in us what is pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen.
NLT: may he equip you with all you need for doing his will. May he produce in you, through the power of Jesus Christ, every good thing that is pleasing to him. All glory to him forever and ever! Amen.
KJV: Make you perfect in every good work to do his will, working in you that which is wellpleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ; to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen.
NKJV: make you complete in every good work to do His will, working in you what is well pleasing in His sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen.
Verse Commentary:
This verse continues a benediction beginning in verse 20. Immediately before that, the writer had asked for prayer from the readers (Hebrews 13:18). Verse 20 mentioned several of the big ideas explained in the letter so far. Among these are the idea of God offering believers peace (Hebrews 12:22–29), Christ as an example to be followed (Hebrews 12:2), resurrection (Hebrews 6:2; 11:19), and the eternal nature of the new covenant (Hebrews 10:12–14).

Here, the writer continues to recycle the major themes of his message. The reference to being equipped meshes with earlier comments about maintaining obedience to God (Hebrews 3:12). The trusting faith defined earlier in Hebrews means following God in obedience, even when we don't fully understand (Hebrews 12:1). Sometimes, as in the case of men like Abraham (Genesis 17:17), Moses (Exodus 4:1, 10), or Gideon (Judges 6:15), we may doubt that we're capable of achieving what God is asking. Faith, however, means relying on God to provide whatever we need in order to accomplish His will. This comment is extremely similar to Peter's statement in 1 Peter 5:10.

The idea that God "works in us" is key to understanding our life experiences. As stated earlier, some events in life are unhappy, but that doesn't mean they have no purpose. For the Christian believer, God's discipline and "training" are part of growing into a stronger, more capable believer (Hebrews 12:5–11). This also echoes Scriptures such as Philippians 2:13, which speaks of God working in us according to His will.
Verse Context:
Hebrews 13:18–25 closes out the letter written to persecuted Jewish Christians. The writer asks for prayer, humbly mentioning his desire to live an honorable life with a clear conscience. This is followed by a benediction which touches on several major themes from the rest of the book of Hebrews. The writer also notes that this writing has only just begun to explore these deep ideas. Hebrews ends with a signature seen at the end of the writings of the apostle Paul: a reference to grace.
Chapter Summary:
Chapters 1—9 explained how the new covenant in Jesus Christ is superior to the old covenant of animal sacrifices. This comparison drew on extensive use of Old Testament Scripture. Chapters 10––12 applied that evidence to encourage Christians to ''hold fast'' despite persecution. The summary of these applications was that believers ought to trust in their faith, and choose to obey God, during times of struggle. Chapter 13 adds a few specific reminders about Christian conduct. This passage also reiterates the idea that Christ is meant to be our ultimate example. The letter concludes with a request for prayer and words of blessing.
Chapter Context:
The last chapter of the book of Hebrews follows a pattern common in New Testament books, especially those written by Paul. The writer gave extensive evidence in chapters 1––9 to support a central idea. This concept was that the new covenant, in Jesus Christ, is superior to the old covenant, composed of the Levitical laws. Chapters 10¬-––12 applied this knowledge to the need for persecuted Christians to maintain their faith. Here, in chapter 13, the writer offers a few specific encouragements for the reader, before signing off with a request for prayer and a benediction.
Book Summary:
The book of Hebrews is meant to challenge, encourage, and empower Christian believers. According to this letter, Jesus Christ is superior to all other prophets and all other claims to truth. Since God has given us Christ, we ought to listen to what He says and not move backwards. The consequences of ignoring God are dire. Hebrews is important for drawing on many portions of the Old Testament in making a case that Christ is the ultimate and perfect expression of God's plan for mankind. This book presents some tough ideas about the Christian faith, a fact the author makes specific note of.
Accessed 6/22/2024 6:28:46 PM
© Copyright 2002-2024 Got Questions Ministries. All rights reserved.
Text from ESV, NIV, NASB, CSB, NLT, KJV, NKJV © Copyright respective owners, used by permission.
www.BibleRef.com