What does Daniel 6:7 mean?
ESV: All the high officials of the kingdom, the prefects and the satraps, the counselors and the governors are agreed that the king should establish an ordinance and enforce an injunction, that whoever makes petition to any god or man for thirty days, except to you, O king, shall be cast into the den of lions.
NIV: The royal administrators, prefects, satraps, advisers and governors have all agreed that the king should issue an edict and enforce the decree that anyone who prays to any god or human being during the next thirty days, except to you, Your Majesty, shall be thrown into the lions' den.
NASB: All the commissioners of the kingdom, the prefects and the satraps, the counselors and the governors, have consulted together that the king should establish a statute and enforce an injunction that anyone who offers a prayer to any god or person besides you, O king, for thirty days, shall be thrown into the lions’ den.
CSB: All the administrators of the kingdom--the prefects, satraps, advisers, and governors--have agreed that the king should establish an ordinance and enforce an edict that, for thirty days, anyone who petitions any god or man except you, the king, will be thrown into the lions' den.
NLT: We are all in agreement — we administrators, officials, high officers, advisers, and governors — that the king should make a law that will be strictly enforced. Give orders that for the next thirty days any person who prays to anyone, divine or human — except to you, Your Majesty — will be thrown into the den of lions.
KJV: All the presidents of the kingdom, the governors, and the princes, the counsellers, and the captains, have consulted together to establish a royal statute, and to make a firm decree, that whosoever shall ask a petition of any God or man for thirty days, save of thee, O king, he shall be cast into the den of lions.
NKJV: All the governors of the kingdom, the administrators and satraps, the counselors and advisors, have consulted together to establish a royal statute and to make a firm decree, that whoever petitions any god or man for thirty days, except you, O king, shall be cast into the den of lions.
Verse Commentary:
Daniel's jealous enemies hated how he was deeply respected by the ruling king. Worse, they found that this respect was well deserved: Daniel left no room for any accusations of any kind (Daniel 6:1–4). The one area where these scheming politicians saw an opening was in Daniel's faith (Daniel 6:5). If they could force Daniel to choose between obedience to God and obedience to human law, it was clear he would choose his faith. The men have gathered, in a large group, to press the king to make a new law (Daniel 6:6).

The advisors present what they claim is a unanimous proposal—Scripture does not indicate whether literally every one of the 120 satraps and the two other governors were on board. However, that is the way the idea is presented to the king. Certainly, Daniel would not have approved of such a law. The proposal is to outlaw prayers unless they are directed at the king, himself. The law seems flattering to Darius (Daniel 5:31), but it is really intended to target Daniel.

Violators would be punished by being placed into a pit or cave, or possibly an artificial enclosure, containing lions. These were probably captured animals used for just such purposes.
Verse Context:
Daniel 6:1–9 follows the demise of the Chaldean king Belshazzar (Daniel 5:30–31). Darius the Mede eventually became the ruler of Babylon and the king of the new empire, Medo-Persia. He placed three officials, including Daniel, in charge of 120 satraps. This passage forms a link between Daniel's appointment and his sentence to die in a den of lions. The rest of the chapter explains how Daniel came into—and through—this predicament.
Chapter Summary:
Babylon's new ruler organizes his territory under 120 satraps and three governors. He intends to make Daniel the most powerful of these, but jealous rivals develop a plot. Knowing Daniel's only "weakness" is loyalty to God, they trick the king into passing an irrevocable law banning prayer. Daniel knows about the law but chooses obedience to God rather than to men. Darius is anguished yet he dutifully follows the law. When Daniel miraculously survives a night in a den full of lions, Darius is elated. He condemns the conspirators to death, and the same lions tear them apart. Darius then proclaims honor on behalf of Daniel's God.
Chapter Context:
At the end of chapter 5, Belshazzar has died and control over Babylon has come to someone identified as "Darius the Mede." Darius organizes his territory under 120 satraps and three governor-level officials. Daniel is identified as one of the three high administrators. After jealous rivals fail to kill Daniel, he continues to prosper in his role. The following chapter begins an extensive record of prophetic visions. The first is a flashback to something Daniel saw during the rule of Belshazzar.
Book Summary:
The book of Daniel contains famous Old Testament stories and prophecies. Daniel was taken from the Israelite people and made an advisor for a conquering empire. He demonstrates faithfulness and wisdom during many years serving in this role. Though Daniel does not deliver a public message, Jesus refers to him as a "prophet" (Matthew 24:15). The first portion of the book mostly describes Daniel's interpretations of dreams and other events. The second portion looks ahead to the end times. Daniel is classified in English Bibles as a "major" prophet, meaning the book is relatively long and the content has broad implications. The book of Revelation echoes and expands on many of the same themes.
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