What does Daniel 3:28 mean?
ESV: Nebuchadnezzar answered and said, “Blessed be the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, who has sent his angel and delivered his servants, who trusted in him, and set aside the king’s command, and yielded up their bodies rather than serve and worship any god except their own God.
NIV: Then Nebuchadnezzar said, 'Praise be to the God of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, who has sent his angel and rescued his servants! They trusted in him and defied the king's command and were willing to give up their lives rather than serve or worship any god except their own God.
NASB: Nebuchadnezzar responded and said, 'Blessed be the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego, who has sent His angel and rescued His servants who put their trust in Him, violating the king’s command, and surrendered their bodies rather than serve or worship any god except their own God.
CSB: Nebuchadnezzar exclaimed, "Praise to the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego! He sent his angel and rescued his servants who trusted in him. They violated the king's command and risked their lives rather than serve or worship any god except their own God.
NLT: Then Nebuchadnezzar said, 'Praise to the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego! He sent his angel to rescue his servants who trusted in him. They defied the king’s command and were willing to die rather than serve or worship any god except their own God.
KJV: Then Nebuchadnezzar spake, and said, Blessed be the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, who hath sent his angel, and delivered his servants that trusted in him, and have changed the king's word, and yielded their bodies, that they might not serve nor worship any god, except their own God.
NKJV: Nebuchadnezzar spoke, saying, “Blessed be the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-Nego, who sent His Angel and delivered His servants who trusted in Him, and they have frustrated the king’s word, and yielded their bodies, that they should not serve nor worship any god except their own God!
Verse Commentary:
When the God of the Hebrews was credited with revealing Nebuchadnezzar's dream (Daniel 2:26–28), the king acknowledged that God's power (Daniel 2:46–49). Yet in Nebuchadnezzar's mind, there was no reason Jews could not honor their God and also worship the deities of Babylon. He flew into an irrational rage when three Hebrew men refused his command to bow in front of an idol (Daniel 3:16–19). They trusted that God could save them but resolved not to sin even if it cost them their lives. Here, Nebuchadnezzar's attitude is not merely reversed, but the pagan king also makes a shocking comment: that the three men were right to disobey his command!

When he first challenged the Israelites, the king sarcastically asked what possible god could protect them from his royal wrath (Daniel 3:15). That insincere question results in a sincere answer: the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego could, and He did just that (Daniel 3:20–25).
Verse Context:
Daniel 3:26–30 records the aftermath of king Nebuchadnezzar's failed attempt to punish those who defied his command to worship an idol (Daniel 3:16–19). The three men were seen alive inside a furnace, along with a fourth person (Daniel 3:24–25). When the three emerge completely unaffected by the flames, the king shockingly acknowledges that their faith was well-placed and that they were right to defy his order. He commands the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego be protected from all criticism and promotes the three Hebrews once again (Daniel 2:48–49).
Chapter Summary:
Nebuchadnezzar builds a golden idol, possibly inspired by the explanation of his own dream (Daniel 2:36–38). He commands all people to worship it, at a given musical signal, on pain of death. Three Hebrew men openly defy this command and are thrown into a superheated furnace. To his shock, the king sees a supernatural figure with the still-living Israelites. Not only do they survive, but their clothes aren't singed nor even smelling like smoke. The king praises their faith, and their God, commanding that no one speak ill of the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego.
Chapter Context:
The first chapter of Daniel explained how four captive Israelite boys became respected advisors to a Babylonian king. Chapter 2 showed these men praying for divine wisdom to untangle that same king's dream. These events set the stage for this chapter and the famous trio of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. The men refuse to bow to an idol and are rescued from fiery death by God. This is the last mention of these men in Scripture, as focus shifts back to Babylon's kings and the prophet Daniel.
Book Summary:
The book of Daniel contains famous Old Testament stories and prophecies. Daniel was taken from the Israelite people and made an advisor for a conquering empire. He demonstrates faithfulness and wisdom during many years serving in this role. Though Daniel does not deliver a public message, Jesus refers to him as a "prophet" (Matthew 24:15). The first portion of the book mostly describes Daniel's interpretations of dreams and other events. The second portion looks ahead to the end times. Daniel is classified in English Bibles as a "major" prophet, meaning the book is relatively long and the content has broad implications. The book of Revelation echoes and expands on many of the same themes.
Accessed 5/26/2024 4:49:38 PM
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