What does Daniel 3:10 mean?
ESV: You, O king, have made a decree, that every man who hears the sound of the horn, pipe, lyre, trigon, harp, bagpipe, and every kind of music, shall fall down and worship the golden image.
NIV: Your Majesty has issued a decree that everyone who hears the sound of the horn, flute, zither, lyre, harp, pipe and all kinds of music must fall down and worship the image of gold,
NASB: You, O king, have made a decree that every person who hears the sound of the horn, flute, lyre, trigon, psaltery, and bagpipe, and all kinds of musical instruments, is to fall down and worship the golden statue.
CSB: You as king have issued a decree that everyone who hears the sound of the horn, flute, zither, lyre, harp, drum, and every kind of music must fall down and worship the gold statue.
NLT: You issued a decree requiring all the people to bow down and worship the gold statue when they hear the sound of the horn, flute, zither, lyre, harp, pipes, and other musical instruments.
KJV: Thou, O king, hast made a decree, that every man that shall hear the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, and dulcimer, and all kinds of musick, shall fall down and worship the golden image:
NKJV: You, O king, have made a decree that everyone who hears the sound of the horn, flute, harp, lyre, and psaltery, in symphony with all kinds of music, shall fall down and worship the gold image;
Verse Commentary:
The accusing Chaldeans (Daniel 3:8–9) remind King Nebuchadnezzar of his recent command: that at a certain musical signal, everyone was to worship the golden image he had constructed (Daniel 3:1–7). Their target will be three of the captive Hebrews (Daniel 1:6–7; 3:12) who were recently honored by the king (Daniel 2:48–49). The way their attack is described indicates pure malice; it's even possible they simply invented the accusation. And yet, it turns out to be true: the Hebrew men did not, and would not, bow to worship an idol (Daniel 3:16–18).

Scripture isn't clear if these accusers were among the same men who failed to discern Nebuchadnezzar's frightening dream (Daniel 2:8–11). If they were the same men, they had been under a death sentence until Daniel saved them and all the other wise men of Babylon (Daniel 2:12, 17–19). They should have been grateful to the Jewish people, but instead they seem jealous. These men may have proven themselves frauds when they could not solve the mystery of Nebuchadnezzar's dream, but here they are very crafty. No doubt their reminder to the king was intended to prod him to take swift action to carry out his own threat.

This verse is one of several (Daniel 3:5, 7, 15) which repeats the same list of musical instruments. This duplication subtly mocks the bureaucratic, heavy-handed nature of Nebuchadnezzar's rule.
Verse Context:
Daniel 3:8–18 records an accusation, a confrontation, and a confession. Daniel's three friends (Daniel 1:6–7) are reported to the king by jealous advisors who claim the Jewish men refused to worship Nebuchadnezzar's golden image (Daniel 3:1, 4–5). The king offers them an opportunity to disprove the charge, or at least to change their minds. Instead, the three faithful men admit they have not and will not compromise their faith in the One True God. Whether they live or die, they will not worship the false gods of Babylon. This passage is part of the Scriptures recorded in Aramaic (Daniel 2:4—7:28).
Chapter Summary:
Nebuchadnezzar builds a golden idol, possibly inspired by the explanation of his own dream (Daniel 2:36–38). He commands all people to worship it, at a given musical signal, on pain of death. Three Hebrew men openly defy this command and are thrown into a superheated furnace. To his shock, the king sees a supernatural figure with the still-living Israelites. Not only do they survive, but their clothes aren't singed nor even smelling like smoke. The king praises their faith, and their God, commanding that no one speak ill of the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego.
Chapter Context:
The first chapter of Daniel explained how four captive Israelite boys became respected advisors to a Babylonian king. Chapter 2 showed these men praying for divine wisdom to untangle that same king's dream. These events set the stage for this chapter and the famous trio of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. The men refuse to bow to an idol and are rescued from fiery death by God. This is the last mention of these men in Scripture, as focus shifts back to Babylon's kings and the prophet Daniel.
Book Summary:
The book of Daniel contains famous Old Testament stories and prophecies. Daniel was taken from the Israelite people and made an advisor for a conquering empire. He demonstrates faithfulness and wisdom during many years serving in this role. Though Daniel does not deliver a public message, Jesus refers to him as a "prophet" (Matthew 24:15). The first portion of the book mostly describes Daniel's interpretations of dreams and other events. The second portion looks ahead to the end times. Daniel is classified in English Bibles as a "major" prophet, meaning the book is relatively long and the content has broad implications. The book of Revelation echoes and expands on many of the same themes.
Accessed 5/26/2024 5:08:38 PM
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