What does 2 Timothy 1:12 mean?
ESV: which is why I suffer as I do. But I am not ashamed, for I know whom I have believed, and I am convinced that he is able to guard until that day what has been entrusted to me.
NIV: That is why I am suffering as I am. Yet this is no cause for shame, because I know whom I have believed, and am convinced that he is able to guard what I have entrusted to him until that day.
NASB: For this reason I also suffer these things; but I am not ashamed, for I know whom I have believed, and I am convinced that He is able to protect what I have entrusted to Him until that day.
CSB: and that is why I suffer these things. But I am not ashamed, because I know whom I have believed and am persuaded that he is able to guard what has been entrusted to me until that day.
NLT: That is why I am suffering here in prison. But I am not ashamed of it, for I know the one in whom I trust, and I am sure that he is able to guard what I have entrusted to him until the day of his return.
KJV: For the which cause I also suffer these things: nevertheless I am not ashamed: for I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day.
NKJV: For this reason I also suffer these things; nevertheless I am not ashamed, for I know whom I have believed and am persuaded that He is able to keep what I have committed to Him until that Day.
Verse Commentary:
Paul's suffering under persecution was due to his work as a preacher, apostle, and teacher (2 Timothy 1:11). Yet, he was "not ashamed" (Romans 1:16). Paul provides two reasons to explain why he was not reluctant to suffer for Christ. First, he could suffer for the sake of Jesus, because he knew Jesus, and Jesus' suffering gave Paul power to endure all things (Philippians 4:13).

Second, Paul said he was not ashamed to suffer because he trusted Christ to be the ultimate foundation, not his own efforts. There is some uncertainty about what Paul is referring to when he says that Christ "is able to guard until that Day what has been entrusted to me." However, this particular reference to a "day" is most likely a reference to the moment after death when Paul would give account of his work before Christ (1 Corinthians 3:13; 2 Corinthians 5:9–10). This is also supported by 2 Timothy 1:18 where Paul will say of Onesiphorus, "May the Lord grant him to find mercy from the Lord on that Day!" There, too, Paul refers to the moment where a believer stands before the Lord.

Some translations use a capital D for "day." This reflects a slightly different interpretation. If this is the capital-d-"Day," then this means the "Day of the Lord," or the moment when Jesus will return in ultimate victory (Revelation 6:17; 16:14).
Verse Context:
Second Timothy 1:8–18 encourages Timothy to be brave and protective of his faith. Paul reminds his dear friend Timothy that the Spirit of God grants Christians spiritual power. As a result, they should not be afraid to associate with persecuted brothers and sisters. Timothy is encouraged to hold to accurate, healthy Christian teachings. Paul also refers to various ministry partners who have supported—or abandoned—him.
Chapter Summary:
Paul introduces himself, then recaps Timothy's path to becoming a minister. He reminds Timothy of how his family brought him up in the faith, and then how Timothy served faithfully with Paul in the past. Paul then focuses on two primary ideas. First, that Timothy's background in the faith should give him the courage to stand fast against hard times. Second, that Timothy should use that courage to defend the truth of the gospel message. Paul will use these points and examples as the foundation for the rest of his letter.
Chapter Context:
Chapter 1 establishes Timothy's spiritual background. Paul expresses gratitude for Timothy, by reminding him of his past, in order to set the stage for later teachings. Paul first expresses gratitude for Timothy's prior faithfulness, and reminds him of how God called him into ministry. From that point, Paul encourages Timothy to be brave and to guard the truth of the gospel message. Later chapters will explain why Paul feels these traits are necessary, both for the sake of the world and for Timothy in general.
Book Summary:
Second Timothy is the last New Testament letter written by Paul. Paul writes these words while awaiting execution by Rome. At this time, around AD 67, Timothy was leading the church in Ephesus. Paul writes to Timothy in order to encourage him. Paul is facing the worst of all hardships: his own impending death. So, he encourages Timothy to stand strong in his faith, with a reliance on the written Word of God. This letter echoes many of the themes Paul uses in his other letters.
Accessed 5/18/2024 6:49:45 PM
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